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Links to further research and recommend reading

In the short term, to help with your navigation of resources, we have placed the suggested further reading against the seven key questions listed below. In the future all the resources will be reorganised against the chapters from the book. Next to each resource is a short caption expressing why the reading has been included.

  1. How do I improve teaching and learning in a school?
  2. How do I motivate people and hold them to account?
  3. How do I design and deliver whole-school change initiatives?
  4. How do I get the basics right (behaviour, expectations)?
  5. How do I improve the instruction of reading and writing?
  6. How do I improve the instruction of mathematics?
  7. How do I become a better manager and leader?

Theme #1: How do I improve teaching and learning in a school?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Books

  • Berger, R (2003). An ethic of excellence. High expectations have a significant impact on learning. A great book.
  • Black, P and William, D (1998). Inside the black box. People think they know what assessment for learning is, but have they read the pamphlet where it was first introduced? If you have not, it is well worth a read.
  • Claxton, G (2002). Building learning power. An important book about how teachers can help students become better learners.
  • Dudley, P (2014). Lesson study: professional learning for our time.  Pete Dudley is one of the leading thinkers on lesson study and perhaps the first person to bring the concept to the UK. This is his latest, very useful book about how to implement lesson study in school.
  • Dweck, C (2012). Mindset: How You Can Fulfil Your Potential. Carol Dweck explains that it is not just talent and abilities that determine success, but whether we have a fixed or growth mindset.
  • Hargreaves, D (2011). Leading a self improving school system. This piece commissioned by NCSL has a really useful section on joint practice development, which sets out the rationale for the approach.
  • Hattie, J (2011). Visible Learning for Teachers. Seminal work in which John Hattie identifies what teachers do that has a significant impact on learning outcomes. This is a really useful way to think about how you identify biggest opportunities for your context.
  • Lemov, D (2010). Teach Like a Champion. A very significant book with highly practical strategies to help teachers transform learning outcomes.
  • Lemov, D (2012). Practice Perfect: 42 Rules for Getting Better at Getting Better. Another important book by Doug Lemov. This one focuses on how deliberate practice helps to develop talent.
  • Nuthall, G (2007). The hidden lives of learners.  A highly recommended book that describes what is involved for pupils to understand and retain a concept.
  • Robinson, V (2011). Student centred leadership.  This well known meta-analysis of the impact of leadership actions on school outcomes summarises the key things leaders do that make the biggest difference to pupils.
  • Santoyo, P (2012). Leverage leadership. This book has a strong section on instructional coaching – how leaders can help teachers improve their practice in classroom.
  • Slavin, R (2010). Co-operative learning: what makes group work work? (Pages 164-174)  An excellent summary of co-operative learning, a widely researched and one of the most effective teaching practices.
  • Wiliam, D (2010). The role of formative assessment in effective learning environments (pages 135-154).  A very good summary about research on formative assessment.

Theme #2: How do I motivate people and hold them to account?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Books:

  • Covey, S (2006). The speed of trust. Well-written and full of practical strategies to improve one’s leadership effectiveness, particularly around ‘Engage’.
  • Covey, S R (2004). 7 habits of highly effective people. Well-written and full of practical strategies to improve one’s leadership effectiveness, particularly around ‘Engage’.
  • Landsberg, M (2003). Tao of Coaching: Boost Your Effectiveness At Work By Inspiring and Developing Those Around You. An excellent short book about coaching, highly recommended.
  • Lencioni, P M (2002). The five dysfunctions of a team; a leadership fable. Beautifully crafted narrative of a new CEO joining their team introduces a very powerful team development model as the story unfolds. A fascinating and very easy to read.
  • Scott, S (2003). Fierce conversations. There are times when difficult conversations need to be had. Susan Scott’s seminal work is full of helpful, tried and tested approaches that really make a difference.

Theme #3: How do I design and deliver whole-school change initiatives?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Books:

  • Fullan, M (2001). Leading the culture of change. Michael Fullan is the guru of change management in education.
  • Fullan, M (2008a). The six secrets of change. This book provides a clear analysis of how you bring about effective change in your school.
  • Kotter, J P (2012). Leading change. Kotter came up with his theory a number of years ago, this is his latest work on his change cycle, how one can bring about change.

Theme #4: How do I get the basics right (behaviour, expectations)?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Theme #5: How do I improve the instruction of reading and writing?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Theme #6: How do I improve the instruction of mathematics?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Books:

  • Haylock, D (2014). Mathematics explained for primary teachers. A highly popular book on maths teaching (this is already the 5th edition), explaining how children learn mathematics and how to teach maths confidently.

Theme #7: How do I become a better manager and leader?

Online reports, articles, blog posts:

Books:

  • Brighouse, T and Woods, D (2008). What makes a good school now? This book is full of hundreds of ideas to improve practice, particularly teaching and learning.
  • Collins, J (2001). Good to great. One of the seminal works from business leadership and management. In it, Jim Collins identifies the key factors that distinguish consistently outstanding organisations from those that are merely good. Lots of this translates into school context.
  • Heifetz, R and Linsky, M (2002). Leadership on the line. A widely acclaimed book on leadership, describing strategies for solving complex challenges as a leader.
  • Goleman, D (2002). The new leaders. Emotional intelligence is a key element in a successful leader’s armory, whole concept came to the fore with this work. Makes the case why emotional intelligence is more important than IQ.
  • Pendleton, D and Furnham, A (2012). Leadership: all you need to know. This well researched and accessible book summarises the history and thinking in the field of leadership.
  • Radcliffe, S (2012). Leadership: plain and simple. In his compelling and beautifully simple Future – Engage – Deliver model, Steve Radcliffe presents an inspiring yet achievable vision in which he is convinced everyone can be a leader.
  • Whitmore, J (2014). Coaching for performance. This is really important. John Whitmore, the inventor of GROW coaching model, describes in this very readable summary how formal coaching and adapting the coaching/leadership style can have a huge impact on the outcomes of an organisation.
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